It feels like my whole life, comics and I have been on this parallel path... My first job was in a comic shop and comics are what got me interested in art. As I got older and more sophisticated, it felt like the medium was growing up right alongside me. The 4-color stuff I read as a kid--Teen Titans, New Mutants—gave way to more mature work. I remember being in high school and seeing my first 'for mature readers' book: Grendel... violence and cussing, the sound effect "Glortch"... I went off to college and during that time when you're really having your mind expanded I got introduced to works by Charles Burns, Dan Clowes, Chris Ware; that crowd, who were opening comics up and picking them apart. People started calling them graphic novels, you could buy them in Barnes & Noble and read reviews of them in the New Yorker. We had both, it seemed, grown up.

I made my first comic and sold it in high school. I'd go around the day before taking orders then made copies (they were 5 cents back then at 7-11s). Printing cost me fifty cents and I'd sell it for a buck. I still like being close to the process; not just making the work, but being hands on with the retailers and the printers. One of the best things about being an indie is you get that direct contact. I think, having grown up with this medium, GUN is my take on what a comic should be. It's labor intensive and it's definitely old school, but it's also 100% an expression of its maker, and I think a lot of great art comes from that point of origin.